clayevans

clayevans

96p

90 comments posted · 0 followers · following 0

3 days ago @ Daily Camera.com: - Boulder Running compan... · 0 replies · +1 points

Presuming you are responding to my post, BBolder:

Quotation marks usually signify - natch - a quotation. But just to clarify, I did not use the term "evil corporation."

Also, I made clear that Henry was not an owner, and made no comment regarding him in relation to the buyout.

I agree that people make the deals they make. No argument there. I can't speak to your points re how debt owed to the previous owners is driving business decisions by the new owners.

Re Gart I refer you to: http://www.gartcompanies.com/the-running-specialt...

I certainly don't blame Johnny for wanting out (that's kind of the dream, isn't it?) or Mark for wanting to stay in (which he did), or either one of them for making the decision they did. Water under the bridge.

What I do object to is the new management style which has, as I noted in my first post, undermined customer service there to a dramatic and noticeable degree. And I prefer companies that see value not just in the bottom line, but in their contributions to and participation in the larger community. And I'm bemused at those who are so certain that the unfettered market always results in the highest, best good — when it comes to larger and larger companies, that is far from a settled proposition; talk to Adam Smith — based simply on the bottom line and price.

Hence, as you advise, I plan to vote with my dollars.

3 days ago @ Daily Camera.com: - Boulder Running compan... · 2 replies · +5 points

Mark was not fired. He was not thrilled about selling in the first place, but that's what he and his partner Johnny — who did want to sell — settled on. Mark had been retained as manager, but didn't like the changes he was seeing — I agree with him there.

Mark still owns his physical-therapy practice. Henry may have been included in discussions about the sale to Gart (my other information comes from reliable sources, but I don't know about this), but he was not an owner and, as such, I can't imagine he had a vote.

I also have to note how touching it is when purists insist that everything the "market" does is, ipso facto, "all good." It's true in general that people with passion start a business, most fail, while many that succeed eventually franchise, expand, sell, etc. But under Mark and Johnny (and formerly Lily), BRC was one of those admirable businesses whose goals went deeper than simply profits. The owners paid their employees well, saw themselves as contributing to the well-being of a community (both runners and Boulder/Colorado at large), and operated accordingly. Surely this resulted in the cardinal sin of failing to maximize profit. Now, under Gart management, the prices are the same or higher, but there are fewer employees and customer service frankly sucks. I'm glad free-market purists think this is awesome, but from where I stand I wish we had more locally owned businesses with the same mindset. We've been trained like good little insects to think that "low-low prices" is the ultimate measure of value, and never mind the rest. No thanks.

Clay Evans

1 week ago @ Daily Camera.com: - BNSF to start trespass... · 1 reply · +9 points

This reminds me of the cyclic hubbub about "trespassers" using the dirt road - not a trail - that runs along the Northern Colorado Water District feeder canal from Lyons to Boulder Reservoir. It's always "this is a *huge* safety issue" or (as the signs hyperbolically shout), "CERTAIN DEATH"!

Yet curiously, nobody ever offers anything like data to back up the alarms. Meanwhile, alleged concerns about "contamination" of canal water are laughable and transparently manufactured. The canal runs through miles and miles of farmland, effluent from which routinely drains bacteria from animal feces, pesticides and more into the water.

Likewise, the city and BNSF evidently don't have any actual data to back up their hand-wringing "huge" safety concerns; if they did, surely they would provide it to the press.

Counter to one post above, it is all but impossible *not* to hear a train engine bearing down on you, as Niwotians well know. The LOBO trail parallels the tracks from Niwot-Longmont, and you can hear trains coming from literally miles away (literally literally). Meanwhile, from my house about a half mile from the tracks, passing trains wake us in the night all the time.

And it appears that usually libertarian-minded commenters are suddenly all about respec' for federal government and rules. One suspects this is merely reflexive antipathy toward cycling and walking, two activities deemed excessively "Boulder" by many. But as they, too, are humans, it's a good bet that they would take the shortcut under the parkway as well rather than walk around like good little Boy Scouts, should they one day find themselves facing that choice.

Prediction: Much hubbub about this, perhaps even a shred of enforcement, then just as with the canal road, the whole issue will just sort of fade away ... until the next time bureaucratic worrywarts, both public and private, feel the need to protect the vulnerable citizenry once again.

1 week ago @ Daily Camera.com: - BNSF to start trespass... · 3 replies · +1 points

Nonsense. Have you been anywhere near this railroad right of way when a train is coming through recently? The LOBO trail parallels the tracks from Niwot-Longmont and believe me, you can hear that engine bearing down from a long, long way away. My house is about a half-mile from the tracks and the train is loud enough to wake us on a routine basis at night.

4 weeks ago @ Daily Camera.com: - Casey Kasem and your e... · 0 replies · +5 points

This is a good, informative piece.

That said, the "Five Wishes" document is no longer considered the gold standard by many hospice organizations and end-of-life planning advocates. This is for a variety of reasons, among which is that it makes certain assumptions that are not appropriate to every situation.

In Colorado, the recommended forms to fill out, file with family and friends (or an attorney) are: the Medical Durable Power of Attorney and Advance Directive for Medical/Surgical Treatment.

But as this writer notes, it is absolutely critical to have honest, detailed conversations not just with your chosen decision maker and doctors, but also with all family members who might conceivably seek to influence decision making when you are unable to (ie the "nephew from Peoria"). Obviously, you cannot control how someone will react, but good communication can forestall many such problems.

You *may* also, in certain situations, want a Medical Order for Scope of Treatment, but be advised that this form is *not necessarily appropriate* or warranted for many people. Learn more or consult an expert, but in general, this form is not necessary or appropriate for people in generally good health.

You can find more information about all this at: http://www.coloradoadvancedirectives.com/contact....

Durable Power of Attorney form: http://www.coloradoadvancedirectives.com/MDPOA_fo...

Advance Directive for Medical/Surgical Treatment: http://www.coloradoadvancedirectives.com/LW_form....

Clay Evans

11 weeks ago @ Daily Camera.com: - What it\'s like to be ... · 0 replies · +3 points

Jacques, I don't know if the author specifically consulted with Barry on how she would be portrayed in the book. But Fagan does a very nice job of not "outing" anyone. Instead, she tells the story of how she sought out mentors and people from whose experience she might gain insight and confidence. In that process yes, the sexual orientation of some of the principals is part of the story.

Clay Evans (reviewer)

28 weeks ago @ Daily Camera.com: - Rich Berman leaving a ... · 1 reply · +2 points

Rich Berman has made a huge impact on young tennis players in Boulder and beyond for four decades. He tried mightily with me, and through no fault of his own, I was never more than average. But he has coached more No. 1 players than you can imagine.

Congratulations, Rich, on an amazing career.

Chad, Ryan and Alan, I know you'll carry on the Rich Berman legacy with pride!

38 weeks ago @ Daily Camera.com: - Released indictment na... · 0 replies · +3 points

Thanks for the kind words.

38 weeks ago @ Daily Camera.com: - Released indictment na... · 2 replies · +5 points

My guess is that the crime will never be solved, sadly.

I spent time with Patsy prior to the murder, in 1994, while working at the Camera. She seemed sort of "spacey," but nice.

I also was granted access to John Ramsey after the media circus really got rolling, after the family felt that it was being hammered by police "leaks" that tended to support the theory that they were guilty. They decided to put out some information of their own, and I was one of a handful of reporters who got to sit with Ramsey and his lawyer, Bryan Morgan.

I genuinely have no idea who committed this crime. What I've said for years is, no matter how you set up the puzzle - i.e. whatever theory you can put together - seems to have at least a couple of pieces missing.

That said — and I've never claimed to be a perfect judge of character — I never saw anything in John Ramsey to indicate anything in any way unusual. Nothing tipped me off about him.

So I remain a fundamentalist agnostic on the case, and I fear it never will be solved.

I do think the implication in the indictment that the Ramseys covered up whoever did it is fascinating.

That's my take, for whatever it's worth.

Clay Evans

38 weeks ago @ Daily Camera.com: - Released indictment na... · 5 replies · +5 points

I have no idea who killed JonBenet, as I have not had access to the evidence. I've said that for years and I remain amused at people who likewise have not seen all the evidence, but are absolutely certain they have the answer.

However, your implication that any good DA would automatically prosecute an indictment is incorrect. The standard of evidence for a grand jury is considerably less than that of a prosecutor. That's why grand juries are said to be willing to "indict a ham sandwich."

The DA at the time looked at the evidence and determined, as legally was his within his duties, that he didn't think he could win a prosecution.

And consider this: Had the Ramseys been prosecuted and acquitted, they would have had a "double jeopardy" argument in their corner, and would very possibly have escaped further prosecution even if more damning evidence had turned up.

Clay Evans