FeministHawk

FeministHawk

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194 weeks ago @ NewsReal Blog - Is It Not Torture When... · 1 reply · +7 points

Dr. Chesler received the following comment via email and asked us to post it here:

When I heard of this arrest I was appaled at the very idea.

I thought surely there would be some kind of light sentence just to appease the world but surely neither a Jew nor Israel would do anything to try to hurt the U.S. I wondered WHY Israel would spy on the U.S.

Well, a lot has happened since that time and now I know, along with a lot of other people, that something insidious has happened to the country I thought I belonged to. I remember when America was good and decent and humane and right. Now, I have lived to see it has become the opposite of all those things...at least the government or so called "leaders" of this nation are.

Why have you waited so long to make this accusation? Evidently, many Americans, including me, had no idea Mr. Pollard was still in prison or at least how he has been treated. Why look at the hue and cry over how the poor terrorists prisoners are being treated in Guantanamo? They have more rights and privileges than Americans do, especially law abiding conservative minded Americans.

Where are the human rights advocates against this kind of inhumane treatment? I wonder how waterboarding compares to solitary confinement on the torture scale? Why don't you take a poll on that question? And keep speaking out for Mr. Pollard.

The way Obama has treated Israel and the Jewish community as a whole, I don't want him to get any glory but I do pray he will for Mr. Pollard's sake.

195 weeks ago @ NewsReal Blog - Twenty Questions About... · 0 replies · +1 points

Dr. Chesler received the following response to this post via email and asked us to share it here:

1. Is pornography “work” or is it a violent crime?
When I think of porn, I think of the San Fernando Valley of California (CA). There it is work: beautiful girls go to the San Fernando Valley to work in porn. The CA porn business is huge, but is being undermined by self-published porn on the internet. Child porn is already illegal and should remain so. For what it's worth, I think porn is degrading to everyone involved in it

2. Is pornography “free speech” in action or is it a violent, often murderous crime?
Your question is too broad. It depends on the situation, of course.

3. Is pornography really a “victimless” crime?
In the first place, it is not a crime. Secondly, if you are to call all porn criminal, then still, you do not always have victims. It depends on the situation.

4. Are pimps, johns, traffickers, and landlords being victimized? If so, why are they not complaining?
No, these 4 categories are not being victimized. They can't complain, because they are breaking the law, and because they are usually victimizers and/or sex traffickers.

5. Are the people, mainly men, who buy and watch pornography being victimized? If so, why are they not complaining? Is anyone forcing them to consume pornography?
It is hard to take this question seriously. Surely you are aware of aspects of the human male libido.
"Victimized" is too strong. Are they being conditioned? yes

6. Are the seductive, taunting, smiling, naked girls and women who are being paid “good” money–victims? If so, why don’t they complain, leave, find some other job?
Most of them are not victims, probably. Again, it depends. If a 17 year old girl has been sexually abused as a child, she may become promiscuous and try to make money from it. Yes, she is a victim. Some women are just wired up differently though and want to 'go for it'.

7. Isn’t working in pornography a job just like any other job–like any other acting job?
I personally do not see the difference between working in porn and working as a prostitute: sex with strangers for money. But the law says differently. And some women I have known who would not work in porn or walk the streets have argued vehemently to me that porn is just another way to make money. And yes, even prostitution.

8. Aren’t pornography actors there of their own free will—for the easy money, the attention, the “stardom?”
Mostly, yes.

9. Isn’t our right to see and read whatever interests us essential to our fundamental liberty?
Only up to a point. I personally have a lot of hostility toward the sex entertainment business. I think it is psychologically destructive especially to women, but I know women who would argue that I'm wrong.

10. Doesn’t the First Amendment guarantee us this right? If we criminalize one kind of “free speech,” where will it end? Who will decide what information or images we are allowed to see? Won’t state or religious censorship chill our rights, even our very thoughts?
If you come down on the 'yes' side of the first question, it is ironic that the USA was at its strongest relative to the rest of the world when we had censorship in Hollywood and on TV. And ironic that during the same 40 years 'the barnyard' has invaded more and more entertainment, our politicos have passed laws to weaken the traditional family structure and emasculate men.

11. On behalf of “free speech,” and privacy rights, didn’t Second Wave feminists avidly collaborate with pornographers to ensure that pornography remained a civil right?
It has been too long since I paid attention to feminist movements, but I think at first the Second Wave was vociferously against porn, and I agreed and appreciated that. Then there was a change, perhaps after the Second Wave's zenith (?), and feminists seemed to embrace porn and prostitution as rights.

12. Didn’t Second Wave feminists launch the battle against violence against women, which included sexual harassment, rape, incest, domestic battering—as well as the most serious battle against pornography and prostitution? Weren’t they vilified for collaborating with Christians and conservatives on the issue of pornography and prostitution?
Yes, that is what I remember.
So, is there a third wave or something? Or really, didn't most of the Second Wave degenerate into elderly radical leftists who despise anyone who doesn't march in lock step with them? I lost interest in feminism maybe in the late 70s or early 80s -- at some point it became more about lesbians and hating men on the one hand, and on the other, it seemed to deny any changes for the better since 1978. I was a 1970 fan of Kate Millette, before her breakdown (or setup, whichever it was), and I acted on my perception of feminism -- I went into the workforce and wound up working in succession for 2 fortune 500 companies.

13. How many women from wealthy and prominent families, or with advanced educations, “choose” to work in pornography or as prostitutes?
Approximately none, I would guess. Perhaps a few rebels who are psychologically damaged. Just guessing.

14. Did you know that, by definition, pornography is that which has to do with “prostitutes.” “Porne” in Greek is a “prostitute.” The so-called actresses in pornography are treated as if they are–and usually soon are–also “working” as prostitutes.
No! Well that fits.

15. How different is being a prostitute from being a stripper, massage therapist, or a nurse?
I cannot believe our culture is so confused that you have to have this question in your list. "Night and day" is one quick response. The existence of the question is an indication of the spiritual poverty of the mass culture.

16. How many prostituted girls and women are actually free to leave, walk out, give it all up?
I have no idea. It would depend on their situation. My guess is that it's very few though.

17. Where might they go? Where might they call “home?” Who will help them get off drugs and alcohol, restore their ravaged health, support them as they deal with the sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS, with which johns have infected them?
OK we have now veered out of discussion of a legal business, the porn industry in CA, to streetwalkers and global sex trafficking. I can't answer these questions. I not only have zero expertise, this set of questions might rate a book-length response.

18. Do you have any idea of what the average age of a pornography actress/prostitute is?
No. Has to be young though.

19. How long a shelf-life does a “working girl” (prostitute, pornography actress) actually have?
I have no idea. I guess it depends, yet again. In the US, we are talking about women who do not want my interest or interference for the most part. Some, I would think, would see interference as rescue though and welcome it. My opinions mean just about nothing, in a boisterously conflicted country of 300 million, so I appreciate your invitation to reply.

20. Why does pornography “turn” people on?
My guess is because human sexuality is a little to a lot mechanical, and because we are primates. Basic instinctual drives.

***
Thank you again. I appreciate your writing and the subjects you choose.

195 weeks ago @ NewsReal Blog - Twenty Questions About... · 0 replies · +1 points

Dr. Chesler received the following response to this post via email and asked us to share it here:

I read your (fascinating)questionnaire.
Here are my quick answers, for all they are worth!

1.- crime
2 - crime
3 - no
4 - no (they are not "victims" but offenders
5 - no no
6 - yes . Thay cannot complain. Too risky!
7 - no
8 - some are fooled, taunted into being "stars" or "rich"...
9 - yes in "orinciple" -- BUT NOT if anyone is victimized.
The key to that OLd dilemma is "there is no "freedom" without responsinility" -- or "Freedom does not exist in an ideal vacuum !"
10 - Ah! The American First Amendment !!!
I was once called a "fascist" because I thought the ACLU (with its vastly vastly Jewish membership) was fighting FOR the rights of
Nazis demonstrating in Chicago... Seen from France, it is a beautiful 18th century American gentlemen illusions! (some were esclavagists!!!)
But it has been derailed and USED by its worst enemies.
It's like Islamist terrorists counting on being treated like human beings after they get caught, etc... or fascists USING democracy rights in order
to toppled down democracy...
AN ENDLESS TOPIC §§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
11 probably yes
12 - yes yes
13 - practically NONE
14 - yes
15 - a prostitute is ALWAYS exploited
16 - None
17 - Nowhere (unless civilized society provides it)
18 - All ages
19 - Depends... Very short (or very old like in aris, but that's another story...) But in all cases TERRIBLE
the "happy whore" -- (Irma la Douce bullshit) is a convenient MYTH
20 - It's THE OLD story: the FORBIDDEN FRUIT STARTED.....in the garden of EDEN, somewhere in the Middle East,
which was probably very similar to the PRESENT Middle East (= Islam, Oil money, sexism, etc, etc...
Our "HERITAGE" !!!....
On a fantasmatic level, deep down, we are all more or less infected (infected? Injected? Inspired? etc...) by IT!
But FANTASIES (esthetic, poetic and otherwise) have always been the PRIVILEGEs of the RICH and POWERFUL...

195 weeks ago @ NewsReal Blog - Twenty Questions About... · 0 replies · 0 points

Dr. Chesler received the following response to this post via email and asked us to share it here:

Dear Dr. Chesler

Thank you for posing these questions; I hope my answers are helpful.

To preface my answers, while I suspect that Megan Fox may be in error about some aspects of Second Wave feminism, I'm also not that interested in the subcategories of feminism, and, with all due respect to you and your Second Wave colleagues, would need to be convinced that it's not just an "inside baseball" distinction before I put much energy into making the distinction.

I do think that Ms. Fox is seriously in error when she ascribes to feminism the adverse effects of birth control. It's a lot more complicated than that. It was my observation from the 60s and 70s that most women didn't need much persuading from feminists to embrace the birth control pill. But then I started college in 1970, and deferring pregnancy was high on most students' lists.

I do think Ms. Fox is correct, though, in ascribing much social damage, particularly to middle class virtues a la Gertrude Himmelfarb (yes, there certainly was hypocrisy -- to some extent, so what; tribute, vice, virtue -- and underlying oppression, etc, but see "side effects" shortly) to feminism in general, and perhaps, though she wasn't there, and hindsight is always wonderful, in criticizing the Second Wave's alliances in other causes with other streams of feminism. I say that in full appreciation of your defense of the Second Wave. It's just that as a homeopath, I'm trained to think of the concept of "side effect" as intellectually dishonest. It's _all_ effect, whether one likes it or not; if you're going to take credit for throwing out the bathwater you have to own helping throw out the baby, too.

As something of a digression, I have long wondered how surgeon William Halstead, who originated the radical mastectomy, had his judgement affected by his struggles with cocaine addiction (which, according to a rather hagiographic biography I read many years ago, transformed him from a hearty, outgoing athlete to an introvert with many weird characteristics -- and, as we have recently learned, was only "controlled" by substituting a morphine addiction which lasted the rest of his life for the even more destructive cocaine.) It would make an interesting graduate thesis to investigate the confluence of the history of the application of statistics to medicine with procedures like the radical mastectomy. I'm not sure if the statistical tools that would probably have destroyed his paper (I read his original papers which proposed the procedure: IIRC, something like one third or more of his surgical subjects were not followed past their hospital discharge following the surgery) were developed when he published; if not, they would be within a decade or two. It is deeply ironic that Halstead, and Johns Hopkins' medical school, which he helped found in emulation of German medicine -- which deprecated "authority" in favor of scientific proof -- accrued so much prestige and authority that bloody, deadly decades of the surgery would follow before the radical mastectomy was finally debunked statistically; I don't think the original paper was ever critiqued in this way.
------

Unwanted pregnancy was made much more avoidable, which diminished the utility of chastity. (A largely middle class virtue; Thomas Sowell's Black Rednecks comes to mind in addition to Himmelfarb.) STDs remained as a possibility, but there was a deliberate campaign, in which feminists avidly participated, to destigmatize STDs and make them a purely medical problem. Antibiotic resistance and viral STDs were trivialized by physicians who, with a combination of Progressive/Marxist thinking (seeking to break down social barriers and transform society) and physicians' natural error of seeing everything in medical/technical terms, acontributed to the spread of STDs.

Their optimism was understandable though the belief in the endless utility of antibiotics was unfounded: Aggressive measures by the military largely kept soldiers returning from WWII and Korea from bringing syphilis and gonorrhea back home with them. My stepfather, alav hashalom, was a physician who vividly described the mass "short arm" inspections he conducted. As a physician in the UC Berkeley student health service in the 1960s, he also saw cannabis and hallucinogens hit, and the emergence of STDs new to the middle class due to the destruction of chastity, which was multifactorial.

It is my own belief that it is spiritually destructive for both men and women to have large numbers of sexual partners. The social constructs that support this ideal, however, are quite fragile. I also believe that, just as things that would have been unimaginable luxuries to the wealthy a few generations ago are now mass commodities, so too, pornography, the consumption of which to any great extent used to be the province of the well-to-do, starred in by either the threatened and exploited or the rare (but extant) extremely degenerate woman.
Now, with the pornification of society and the erosion of middle class virtue, private sex videos are often initiated by women who think of themselves as being sexually free. Commercial porn, to compete in a market in which pornographic imagery is available for free, is becoming more extreme.

Now to the questions:

1. Is pornography "work" or is it a violent crime?

I believe that this is based in a false distinction, arising from the fundamental error of construing human activity in solely economic terms. It is clearly "work" in the economic sense. I live in a university town; I have often heard _all_ work described as violent crime. This specious reasoning has tainted much "Progressive" thinking and debases the conversation. I hear resonances of this in the question as phrased.
By the way, I remember reading Barbara Seaman's work and agree that you are correct in seeing (as IIUC you do) an analogy between pornography as exploitation with violence either explicit or implicit underlying it and the initial human trials of oral contraception on poor women in Puerto Rico.

2. Is pornography "free speech" in action or is it a violent, often murderous crime?

The critical question is: is it always violent, or at least is violence always indispensible to it?

3. Is pornography really a "victimless" crime?

(see #2)

4. Are pimps, johns, traffickers, and landlords being victimized?

Probably not.

If so, why are they not complaining?
Johns don't complain because of the fantasy of no strings sex, plus the fulfillment of other fantasies.

Everybody else-- power, money...

5. Are the people, mainly men, who buy and watch pornography being victimized?

Not exactly, though objectifying other human beings, being vicious in the original sense, damages them, too.

If so, why are they not complaining? Is anyone forcing them to consume pornography?

People rarely complain about activities that provide pleasure.

Most of the rest of your questions seem to answer themselves, but:
10. Doesn't the First Amendment guarantee us this right? If we criminalize one kind of "free speech," where will it end? Who will decide what information or images we are allowed to see? Won't state or religious censorship chill our rights, even our very thoughts?
Good questions, uncomfortable answers. I have come to be something of a First Amendment fundamentalist. Second, too, though not to the same degree.

11. On behalf of "free speech," and privacy rights, didn't Second Wave feminists avidly collaborate with pornographers to ensure that pornography remained a civil right?

Perhaps not, and correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the privacy argument, which Judge Bork said was specious in Roe vs Wade -- IIRC he stated at his confirmation hearing that there might have been non-penumbra, non-privacy reasons to reach the same decision-- has been destructively applied.

13. How many women from wealthy and prominent families, or with advanced educations, "choose" to work in pornography or as prostitutes?

Very few, though many more behave in "pornified" ways.

14. Did you know that, by definition, pornography is that which has to do with "prostitutes." "Porne" in Greek is a "prostitute." The so-called actresses in pornography are treated as if they are–and usually soon are–also "working" as prostitutes.

Yes, I knew that.

15. How different is being a prostitute from being a stripper, massage therapist, or a nurse?

Massage therapists -- some are legitimate healers, some are prostitutes; there are well trained therapeutic massage practitioners who also provide sexually related services. Nurses... as a profession, historically, until Florence Nightingale weren't they camp followers and prostitutes except for religious women who cared for the sick? I've known some nurses who were pretty promiscuous, which I think was in part a bad way to cope with a stressful job, and in part a tendency to objectify (to cope with stress?) all people, including themselves.

I hope some of this helps.

195 weeks ago @ NewsReal Blog - Twenty Questions About... · 0 replies · +1 points

Dr. Chesler received the following response to this post via email and asked us to share it here:

Answer to question #7. Isn’t working in pornography a job just like any other job–like any other acting job?

No. Pornography work is just a form of legalized prostitution. Both actor and actress are paid to perform a sex act, under the guise of making a film with a license to do so. If I or any other private citizen were to hire an “actress” to perform a sex act, even if I just watched, I could be arrested as a John. This is why porn is popular – legalized peeping toms.

No other acting job pays to be physically penetrated sexually. This penetration serves as both a biological function – the production of babies, and a social function, the bonding between the participants in the sex act. This baby and bonding mix of sex is supposed to produce strong emotional ties, however, once sex is abused by violence (perceived or actual) repeatedly used with many partners, or as a mechanism of entertainment, it physically degrades the human body, the mind and spiritual nature of a person. Because of this degradation, actors often look for other avenues to help cope, and find a hard time creating and maintaining healthy emotional relationships.

195 weeks ago @ NewsReal Blog - Twenty Questions About... · 0 replies · +1 points

Dr. Chesler received the following response to this post via email and asked us to share it here:

We should focus on the phallic symbol - minaret - of the pornographic ideology of Islam that Mohammed's ghost writers and followers used to graphically tell us they want to f--k us to death.

Just as the minarets call their pimps to come pray for the destruction of our values and ourselves, pornography calls us to the destruction of family values.

So much for snuff films.

236 weeks ago @ NewsReal Blog - Every Pure Muslim Girl... · 1 reply · +2 points

Great post, Jeanette. I have two words: stealth jihad.

236 weeks ago @ Frontpage Magazine - Feminist Hawk Rising · 0 replies · +1 points

Dah. Unimpressed. I'm tougher.

236 weeks ago @ Frontpage Magazine - Feminist Hawk Rising · 0 replies · +1 points

I do not appreciate your disrespectful comments one bit. "Ugly"? Are you blind?! Sounds like projection, I imagine. I see you don't even bother to come up with a clever name, and forget showing YOUR face.

237 weeks ago @ NewsReal Blog - Feminist Hawk Rising! · 1 reply · +4 points

Oh you'll see that I can be very bad, especially to Islamofascist apologists and pseudo-feminists.